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  #1  
Old 07-14-2003, 04:48 AM
Daless2 Daless2 is offline
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Auxiliary Cooling ? Hood Louvers / Vents

Auxiliary Cooling ? Hood Louvers / Vents

Hi Folks, this will be the first of at least two, possibly three write-ups on my efforts to better manage under hood temperatures.

This one will be on Hood Louvers and my thinking, testing and implementation on my 97 TJ with 4.0L.

The second will be on Evaporative Cooling and how it can be used, for short term extra cooling when needed.


OK, here we go. I will be writing this in sections and posting each as I can find the time.


End Result

I think the best way to start this off is with the results and a picture of the end result.

Given an outside air temperature of 90+ degrees F, I have been able to reduce the under hood air temperatures on my 97 TJ by as much as;

-11 degrees F at Idle.
-16 degrees F during Stop and Go
-27 degrees F during Highway Travel



Here is what this implementation looks like.




What you are looking at is the hood of my Jeep after installing the Louvers which allow the under hood temperatures to be lowered as I have shared above.

Yes I think they look nice, but function is what I was going after in doing this modification. Prior to installing the louvers I did quite a bit of investigating, research and testing.

With the help of my friend Kevin, who owns an automotive testing lab capable of measuring temperatures and pressures I set out on this task.


Where to install the louvers?

What I was looking for was the most effective location to install the Louvers!

I wanted to know two things;

1 Where is the heat the highest under my TJ?s hood.

And

2. Where if any is there a vacuum (low pressure) location on top of the hood .(Yes even a Jeep has aerodynamics, be they poor.)

Please note I did give some thought to determining where, if any, a high pressure point would be UNDER the hood, but I did not elect to follow up on this.

Temperature Measurements and Findings

To determine the highest temperature locations under the hood I made more then a few trips to my friend Kevin?s lab. There I barrowed 48 temperature sensors, and the computer/recording device to capture the data I wanted.

The 48 sensors where mounted on the underside of my hood, forming a grid that covered the better part of the under hood. (Approximately 1-inch below the hood)

My thought was to find those areas that would get the hottest, and then look to see if I could install the louvers in this location.

I wasn?t really sure I needed to this as ?I was sure I knew? where the greatest heat would be found. Trust me, I was wrong.

Here is a simple drawing that reflects the plotted data elements collect from my tests locating the highest under hood air temperatures on my TJ.






The red shaded areas represent the highest temperature areas, under the hood, taken approximately 1-inch below the hood.

Everything under the hood gets hot, yet these areas had temperatures of at least 20 Degrees F hotter then all the others.

Remember when I said ?I already knew? where the heat was located?

I was wrong.

It wasn?t on top of the engine or even centered on the exhaust manifold as logic would suggest.

Why is this?

I have no clue, only guesses.

I suspect part of this is due to the air movement caused by the fan, and part probably has something to do with heat being trapped between engine compartment components.

I am sure there may be other good explanation as well. All I know is that I am confident, at least on my Jeep, this drawing represents the highest under hood AIR temperatures, by geography, in my engine compartment.

For the record, the single highest temperature I recorded in this effort was located 4-inches in front of the firewall, and 6-inches off the center toward the driver side.


Please note while there are significant differences in high temperatures for each of the three tests that I ran, (Idle, Stop and Go, and Highway) the pattern of High Temp Location never changed significantly. Meaning, the hottest locations remained the hottest locations regardless of what test was performed.



Temperature Testing Methodology

In order to capture the temperatures accurately I used a methodology I have used in another cooling system test write-up. It goes like this.

The equipment I used this time had 48 temp sensors as explained above. Each was mounted to the underside of the hood about 1-inch off the hood. (I was measuring Air temperatures, not surface temperatures.)

These sensor recorded time and temperature data, ever 3 seconds, to a small hand-held data collection device. All temperatures are in degrees F and recorded to an accuracy of 1/10 of a degree F.


Types of Tests:

I performed a set of three different tests throughout this effort [I](At Idle, Stop and Go, and Highway)[/u]. Each set was performed no less then 4 times, prior to installing the louvers and after installing the louvers


At Idle Test:
This test measured and recorded all under hood air temperatures from each of the 48 sensors with the Jeep idling in my driveway for 15 minutes after a 5-minute warm up period.

Stop and Go:
This test was a 6-mile stop and go, inner city drive, after a 5 minute warm up period. Again measuring and recording all under hood air temperatures from each of the 48 sensors.

Obviously each test was not exactly the same as stoplights and traffic most likely did differ to a small degree. But the course was indeed exactly the same each time. Max Speed was 25 MPH.

Highway:
This test covered a distance of 18 miles on Interstate 75. Nine miles down the interstate, off the exit, turn around and nine (9) miles back. Highway Speed maintained at 65 MPH. Again measuring and recording all under hood air temperatures from each of the 48 sensors.


Test Notes:
As I stated, each of these tests was conducted multiple times. The data I will be am sharing is the data I have for those days when the outside air temperature was the hottest. for each setup (with or without louvers.)

Also note, the outside air temperatures are different for each of these tests, In every case the outside air temp was Lower for the ?No Louver? tests, then it was for the ?Louvered? tests.

Folks I have a lot of temp data and I will be sharing it farther on down in this write-up as time permits. Hopefully in a way that is easy to understand.



Identifying the Low Pressure / Vacuum Areas on the Hood

I wanted to determine where, if any place on the hood a low pressure or vacuum area might be located.

Being I don?t have access to a wind tunnel I had to get creative here.

I taped to the hood 48 pieces of yarn, each 3-inches long, in the approximate locations to where the under hood temp sensors where mounted.

The yarn was taped (with duck tape) to the outside surface of the hood and then I simply drove the Jeep and observed what happened..

You?d be amazed at how and what directions the yarn will flow and point to. Sometime it even sticks straight up! (Good Vacuum for a brick)

Based on more then a few drives with the yarn on my hood (talk about funny looks from people) and a lot of note taking I determined to my satisfaction the low-pressure area.

Here, shaded in the pinkish color are my results.





If you decide to do this little exercise on your own be aware you need to get yourself going at least 25 MPH for this to be effective. I could not discern any significant difference in airflow patterns at any speed over 25 MPH.

The shaded areas represent the locations where the yard either shot straight back (To the back of the Jeep) or shot straight UP in the air once up to speed.

In some areas, like close to the windshield, the yard pointed toward the front of my Jeep confirming the high-pressure area at the base of the windshield.

After I did all this testing and came to my own conclusions about the low-pressure (vacuum) areas I showed my results to Kevin. He looked at them, dropped them on the table, when to a cabinet, and preceded to hand me a testing tool to validate my results.

Unfortunately he only had two pressure sensors so I had to do a lot of driving, recording, stopping and moving sensors around. But I did it.

For what it is worth I can now tell you this; $1.99 worth of yarn and a bit of duck tape came up with the same answer as a very expensive piece of lab test equipment. J




Hood Louver Location

I now knew where the highest under hood temperature were located.

I also had to a reasonable degree of accuracy, the locations on the outside of the Jeep?s hood where the low pressure / vacuum areas were located.

To determine where to mount the louvers all I did was to lay one set of data elements on top of the other and look for commonality of location, or overlap.

Here is what it looked like.




See those locations where the High Temp and Low Pressure areas overlay each other?

That?s where my louvers are installed. (Life is Simple J ! Life is Good!)




That?s it for now folks. I have a lot more to put up here.

Have a great day,

Frank
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  #2  
Old 07-14-2003, 07:15 AM
ChrisK ChrisK is offline
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Frank,
Thanks for postingt this. I keep telling myself that this is the summer I was going to cut holes in my hood to try to help my poor Arizona Jeep fight the heat, I just wasn't sure where to cut them. Now I know.
What vents did you use? Part #s?

Chris
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Old 07-14-2003, 08:40 AM
mrblaine mrblaine is offline
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Well Frank, that answers a question I have pondered for awhile. I now know why some people encounter vapor lock of their braking system on hot days. The master is located in the hottest part of engine compartment.
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Old 07-14-2003, 09:06 AM
cookie cookie is offline
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I'm glad this was brought up. Lately since the temperatures have gone to 115*, I have been feeling the heat pouring off my jeep's hood after I park it in the garage and was looking at putting in louvers or spacing up the hood. All that heat can't be good for the PCM and other electronic doo-dads under there. Maybe it is also why I keep breaking the little plastic retaining clips on the sensors when I disconnect them. They are brittle.

The ones on Frank's jeep look like the ones on a 5.9 WJ maybe?
The only louvers I've seen in the junkyards around here at from those little hatchback datsuns and they are awful sundried. They did have some type of rain shield on the underside of them though. I wonder how necessary that shield is or if the WJ ones have rain shields.

The underhood components in a YJ are pretty close to a TJ's. I might have to move my open element air filter so it isnt directly under the louver so it won't get soaked in a rain.

Where is your air intake filter at Frank? Is it the factory air box on the passenger side? Do you think there might be a hot spot difference with the corresponding movement of the air intake location?

You have done outstanding work testing out all this stuff.
thank you,
ty
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Old 07-14-2003, 09:09 AM
Dan-H Dan-H is offline
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Hi Frank.

Very nice.

if its not too late to add more test cases to the mix, there is one I'm curious about, and that is the "stopped at a light after a highway run" test.

I have read this is when the highest underhood temps occur, and it would be interesting to see the temp graph over time, say about 5 to 10 mins.

the other test case is the pull into the driveway and shut off the engine test case.

- Dan

ps: I'm also interested in the vent source.
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:07 AM
Hellbender Hellbender is offline
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Frank, this is very interesting, and your results correlate almost exactly with my crude attempt to duplicate what you are doing.

When I built all my skids, about 2 years ago, I looked a little at the heat problem, I used an infrared gun, and directly above my gas pedal, I once got a reading (from inside the cab) of 255 degrees!!!

Are you using the Pontiac louvers? If so, do they have a rubber one way rain shield inside?

I also looked a little for a louver that would mount on the side/fender panels (flat area under side "Wrangler" stickers).

I think all the airflow (big radiator and fan) work in the front of the engine is useless without giving it a place to go out in the rear of the engine compartment, ie., it bottles up from the exhaust manifold and sits on the firewall.

Our cool skid plates make things even worse.

Good work and keep going!

HB
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:12 AM
sethmark sethmark is offline
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Has anyone had a TJ ever overheat?
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:14 AM
TObject TObject is offline
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I have.

My jeep overheated once, when the fan stuck in the shroud, and I got into stop-n-go trafic.

It almost overheated when I was towing a disabled CJ behind out of Los Coyotes. I stopped, let it cool down, and then continued.
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:17 AM
Robert J. Yates Robert J. Yates is offline
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Mines never overheated but it wants run warm and has done that since I got the thing. I've lowered my winch and then spent alot of time plumbing in more reserve by installing a new HD fan clutch, an all metal 3 row radiator, a tranny cooler and I have also tried water wetter and it still wants to run warm. I'm actually wanting an oil cooler but am stuck on where to plumb it in - space is really at a premium.

Frank, what type of louvers and how did you go about getting them frenched into the hood?
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:21 AM
Darrell C Darrell C is offline
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Frank,

As usual, great write-up.

I also would be interesting in knowing the specifics on the vents.
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:23 AM
Darrell C Darrell C is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Robert J. Yates
<snip> I've lowered my winch ...
Robert,

Curious as to how you accomplished this. Can you provide a description or pics??

Darrell
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:28 AM
Robert J. Yates Robert J. Yates is offline
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Oh, nothing more scientific than the expenditure of additional $$ by junking my perfectly good Tomken winch plate and going to a Hansen bumper that mounts the winch directly on it This was good for lowering my winch in front of the radiator by 2" which helped alot.

At one time I became really concerned over mounting anything in front of the radiator so I installed a billett style tranny cooler under the Jeep rather than blocking up the grill. My fears have been confirmed as I recently added a small stacked plate cooler for my power steering/hydroboost set-up and the only real place for it to go was in front of the radiator - I now figure that was good for 5 degrees more in operating temp on the freeway :sad:
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Old 07-14-2003, 10:30 AM
Hellbender Hellbender is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by sethmark
Has anyone had a TJ ever overheat?
My feet sure do!

Until I had my computer flashed on the update mine overheated several times.

I think the computer only lets the temp. gauge show you what it wants to anyway, amazing how EVERYONE'S guage stays within a few degrees of 210. The computer just changes things around (timing, etc.) until it feels the best and can make things stay within it's parameters.

It only pops up high if there's a real problem the computer can't overcome (low water, waterpump, etc.).............that's my theory, anyway.
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Old 07-14-2003, 11:59 AM
William William is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by sethmark
Has anyone had a TJ ever overheat?
I have. And it's good to run at a lower temp if possible. Not toooo low, but lower is good. And out in the heat, and on the rocks...

Frank, have you ever thought of putting small electric fans on the hood in that location to exhaust hot air, or suck in cool air?

Seems that the small fans floating around are cheap, and small enough.

Opinion?

Also, where did you get the vents from?
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Old 07-14-2003, 11:59 AM
Daless2 Daless2 is offline
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Hi Folks,

I am having difficulty putting this post up. For some reason only half the post went up the last time I tried.

Sergey, the delete function is not working for me.

Sorry for the ? post duplicate above. Please disregard.



I have a lot of data I want to put up but there seems to be a rather large interest in getting to the part numbers and the install so I will use the limited time I have today documenting that part.

Louvers, Drip Pans and Part Numbers

The louvers I am using come from a 1994-96 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP. These are functional hood louvers and are made out of a high temperature resistant Nylon.

In addition to the louvers I also purchased the drip pans, which mount inside the hood, under the louvers. PLEASE NOTE: The drip pans severely restrict airflow out of the louvers. I purchased them to install during the winter weather months when I don?t really want to loose very much of my engine compartment heat.

Here is a picture of the Louvers (top and bottom0, and the drip pans as they come from the Pontiac dealer.




As you can see the vents come snow-white nylon and have to be painted. I used DupliColor ?Bumper Black? as it contains a flex agent that should allow for expansion and contraction without harming the paint.

Here is what they looked like after painting.



Sorry this picture is a little grainy

I did put the nylon louvers in my bead-blasting cabinet for a few minutes to rough them up some prior to painting. I did not use any primer or other flex agent, other then the Bumper Black rattle can stuff. So far the paint is holding up well.


Part Numbers and Costs

#10225885 - Left Side Louver $27.23
#10230097- Left Side Drip Pan $4.56

#10225886 - Right Side Louver $27.23
#10230098 - Right Side Drip Pan $4.56


Installation

Template Location

Once I knew the area I wanted to install the louver at I made a template to match the underside of the louvers so I could mark the holes I needed to cut in the hood of my Jeep.

Note: If I can come up with a way to replicate this cardboard template, I will do so and would be happy to send them out to folks if you have an interest. Let me see what I can do with it first.

I covered the hood on both sides with masking tape so that I could trace the template out on the hood in the proper location on both side.

Here is a picture of the template in place ready to be traced.

Please Note, it is the inside edge of the template that gets traced, as well as the holes that mark the drill locations. The outside edge of the template represents the outside edge of the louver when it is installed.





Please take note of the two nickels and the long piece of blue marking tape.

The blue tape is exactly 20.75-inches (20 and ?-inches) from the rear edge of the hood. This is important. This places the front edge of the louvers. If you do this, DO NOT go less then 20 and ?-inches or you will have a clearance issue inside the hood with the bracing on the rear edge of the hood.

The two nickels where used to space the template (and louver) away from the curvature of the hood where it bumps up. Just lay the two nickels down and push them up to the curve while allowing the nickels to remain level and NOT ride up the curve. This will mark one edge of the template (and louvers) for you.

Tape the template down and then trace the inner section on the tape. Be sure to trace and mark the eight (8) holes that you will have to drill to mount the louvers through the hood.


Drill and Cut

Here is a picture of the template traced on the masking tape and the eight holes (6 are 5/16-inch and two locating holes are 1/8-inch) drilled in my hood.

You can also see I marked the section that needs to be cut out with a criss-cross pattern so even if I where having a blonde day it would be difficult for me to screw up.




Piece of advise. Tape and trace the template on both sides of your hood before you do any drilling or cutting. In this project you want to measure 5 times and cut only once for each louver hole.

Prior to making ?the big cut? on each side I drilled several pilot holes in the section of my hood that would be cut out. I also protected the hood with some duck tape to keep the vibration on the Air Saw shoe from scratching the paint.





I suppose any number of tools can cut this hole out. I used an Air powered Body Saw which I have had for years. If you don?t have one maybe you can barrow one from a friend. These things cut single thickness sheet metal like a hot knife through butter, leave no distortion in the hood when done. Also, Harbor Freight sells these every day of the week for $39, but every three or four weeks they have them on sale for $20.

After cutting the hole on the template line all I had to do was take a file to de-burr the edge and trial fit the louvers. They fit perfectly. I did use touch up paint on the edges that I cut.

Sorry don?t have a picture of the hole.

I mounted the louvers using 3M-brand Trim tape purchased at Auto Zone. This stuff is incredible. I just laid a 1/8-inch bead of tape all around the underside of the louver and put the louver in place.

Tip! DO NOT pull the backing off the 3M trim tape until you have the louver in place on the hood. Once in place you can pull the backing off and press the louver right down. Trust me, it will not move, and you will not get it off again without sliding a knife between the louver and hood to cut the tape.

Here is a picture from under the hood at the driver?s side louver. See those little white stand-offs? The drip pan mounts to these stand-offs with screws.





Here is a rather poor picture of the drip pans temporality mounted to the underside of the louvers.





As I said before, the drip pans severely impact the performance of the louvers. I have mine off and they will stay off until winter.

Based on the size of each louvers opening I have calculated each is the functional equivalent of cutting a 5-inch square hole on each side of your Jeeps hood.

You can see the heat, and distortion cause by the heat from the drivers seat. It is not enough to hinder your vision, but it is quite noticeable.

Here are two more pictures of the louvers installed.


.
.

.
.
I will do more writing later. For now I do want to read the comments more closely and try to replay to those that I have not addressed yet.

Frank
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Old 07-14-2003, 12:46 PM
Robert J. Yates Robert J. Yates is offline
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very nice Frank. I appreciate the write up.
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Old 07-14-2003, 01:36 PM
Desert Fox Desert Fox is offline
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Cool

Great write up! I often wondered why FJ40s had
hood louvers near the rear of the hood and louvered vents behind the front fenders. No doubt they had the same heat dissipation problems we do.

Fred
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Old 07-14-2003, 01:42 PM
Jerry Bransford Jerry Bransford is offline
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That is a nice idea and exactly what my then-Datsun 240Z dealer did to help my then-new '73 240Z with its vapor lock and overheating problems. It worked very well, this sounds like a good Jeep mod too.
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Old 07-14-2003, 02:58 PM
ChrisK ChrisK is offline
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I only have 10 pennies. Will that work instead of 2 nickels?



Guess I will be running down to the Pontiac dealer soon.

Chris
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Old 07-14-2003, 03:00 PM
ChrisK ChrisK is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hellbender
I think the computer only lets the temp. gauge show you what it wants to anyway, amazing how EVERYONE'S guage stays within a few degrees of 210. The computer just changes things around (timing, etc.) until it feels the best and can make things stay within it's parameters.
Actually, mine does not do this. It fluctuates a lot as I drive. Almost everyone else I talk to says theirs just sits at 210 until something bad happens and then it jumps to the extreme. Mine seems to change dynamically as it should.

My TJ is a 97. Maybe they changed it in later builds

Chris
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Old 07-14-2003, 05:32 PM
norcaljr norcaljr is offline
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Frank,

Great write up. This is a common mod for the LWB guys. Where did you find the parts at that price ? best I have found so far is around $90 for everything.

Jim
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Old 07-14-2003, 08:28 PM
Daless2 Daless2 is offline
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Hi Ty,

My air intake is using the stock air box that I have relocated to fit just above the distributor so that wasn't any issue with concern for rain water coming into the filter on my TJ.


Hi Dan,

It's never too late for anything, however given I now have two holes filled with louvers in my hood it might be a bit difficult to get any reading of before and after in the areas you have an interest in.

Right now I am going to put a focus on getting the numbers up on the testing I have already done. Once that's done I would be happy to see what I can do to help you out in this area.


Hi Brad,

I agree. We capture and hold a tremendous amount of heat in that engine bay.

Heat management on a Jeep, is in my opinion a poor design at best, and at worst a compromise solutions that does not even come close to addressing the cooling needs when operating at the extremes of what a Jeep can do, in extreme environments.



Think about this for a second.



You have an engine that must be cooled. So what do we do?



We run coolant through the water jackets in the engine and pump it FORWARD to the radiator to blow air through it that picks the heat up only to BLOW IT RIGHT BACK ONTO THE ENGINE YOU ARE TRYING TO COOL.



Does anyone thing this is a good design? I think it is more then a little bit basically flawed!



Then stick a condenser in front of that radiator, an oil cooler, perhaps a power steering cooler that you need to keep those temps under 180 F and maybe a remote auto trans cooler and things only get more complex.



Another function which effects cooling significantly and may create a need for better temperature management are altitude, humidity levels, and the degree of load an on or off road trip may be putting out.(Is it extreme rock crawling or a trail ride I'm on? It would matter.)





Hi William,



You are stealing my thunder with the electric fan idea!



My plan is to mount two auxiliary coolers, one for my Power Steering Fluid and another for the Engine Oil right below the two drip pans which I will cut out.



Not only will these cooler have electric fans pushing the air through them and through the louvers, but they will also have an Evaporative Cooling System as well. Sort of like those Misters you folks in SoCal see all over the place.



Evaporative cooling, using distilled water from Wal-Mart and the Windshield Washer tank/pump can and does provide an unbelievable drop in temperatures.



The key is to use only as much water as can be evaporated on the fins of the cooler. Anymore is not only wasted but also impacts efficiency in a negative way.



I have done a lot of experimenting on this, (on my kitchen stove and in the shop. Now I am getting ready to build a system for the Jeep.





Hi Jim,



I have a newer Pontiac Grand Prix GTP that was called in for a safety recall. I waited for it being it was to take only a half an hour. They lied.



Two hours later it still wasn't done. Needless to say I was a bit ticked. While waiting there I saw a 94 GTP with these louvers. I asked the service manager if he could get me the part numbers for them. He was very accommodating. He ordered them for me and they were in the next day.



I tell you this story becuase perhaps given I was more then a bit ticked he managed to get me a better price then I could normally get them for. I do have the invoice I received with the parts and that's all I paid for them



Good luck on your hunting them down. Maybe try another dealer.





Thank you all for your kind words, I am glad many may find this useful.



Frank
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Old 07-14-2003, 08:38 PM
Daless2 Daless2 is offline
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I have received more then a few questions via email and PM on how the louvers and drip pans are mounted to the hood. Here is a bit more info on the topic.

The Louvers themselves I have held in place using 3M double-sided trim tape on the bottom edge of the louvers and the top of the hood.

There are six (6) little studs on the louvers that pass through the holes you need to drill in the hood. The drip pan is held in place on these studs with six small screws.

I just took a few more pictures to post.

Here is part of a louver illustrating the studs as they come through the hood.






Please note, the little pin in the center near the top of the louver is a locating pin for the drip pan. There is another on the other end. Kinda just lines everything up nicely to put the drip pan on.


The drip pan is not very thick at all. At it?s widest point I just measured 9/16-inch. My engine compartment is stuffed yet I have no clearance issue with these on..

Here is a somewhat poor side view of the drip pan. That circle is a dime sitting on a 2x4 block of wood holding the drip pan almost on edge..
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For clarities sake I took a picture of the bottom of the drip pan. You can see the six holes where the screws go in to hold it to the underside of the hood and louver.
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And the last picture is of the top of the drip pan. This is what goes against the bottom of the hood.
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As I said the drip pan is held in place with six small screws into the louver studs that pass through the hood. This isn?t a problem for me but I will probably figure out a way to hold them in place using a Velcro strip or something like it..

Hope this answers some of the question I received via PM and elsewhere.

Good night all, I'm tired.

Frank
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  #24  
Old 07-15-2003, 10:20 AM
Hellbender Hellbender is offline
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Frank, it looks like you could "blueprint" those louver slots with a dremel and open them up about 3/16" all around.

Would add a lot more "hole" area, maybe double it.

Just a thought,
HB
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Old 07-15-2003, 10:30 AM
Robert J. Yates Robert J. Yates is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChrisK
Actually, mine does not do this. It fluctuates a lot as I drive. Almost everyone else I talk to says theirs just sits at 210 until something bad happens and then it jumps to the extreme. Mine seems to change dynamically as it should.

My TJ is a 97. Maybe they changed it in later builds

Chris
Mines' a 98 and it does the same thing as yours.
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Old 07-15-2003, 11:03 AM
Paradiddle Paradiddle is offline
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Frank - I'm floored at the amount of research you do on all your projects. Incredible writeup and a neat mod.

Jeff
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Old 07-15-2003, 11:43 AM
Jerry Bransford Jerry Bransford is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Robert J. Yates
Mines' a 98 and it does the same thing as yours.
So does mine.
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  #28  
Old 07-15-2003, 12:28 PM
Dan-H Dan-H is offline
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My 01 sits at 210 no matter what. If the guage is computer controlled, they have decided that 210 means "normal".
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  #29  
Old 07-15-2003, 12:56 PM
Jeff Weston Jeff Weston is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dan-H
My 01 sits at 210 no matter what. If the guage is computer controlled, they have decided that 210 means "normal".
Exact same thing as with my '99 except for the time that the thermostat acted up and it'd never get above about 130*. I know it wasn't the gauge because the heater wouldn't warm up either.
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Old 07-15-2003, 12:59 PM
William William is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Daless2
Hi William,



You are stealing my thunder with the electric fan idea!



My plan is to mount two auxiliary coolers, one for my Power Steering Fluid and another for the Engine Oil right below the two drip pans which I will cut out.



Not only will these cooler have electric fans pushing the air through them and through the louvers, but they will also have an Evaporative Cooling System as well. Sort of like those Misters you folks in SoCal see all over the place.

Evaporative cooling, using distilled water from Wal-Mart and the Windshield Washer tank/pump can and does provide an unbelievable drop in temperatures.

The key is to use only as much water as can be evaporated on the fins of the cooler. Anymore is not only wasted but also impacts efficiency in a negative way.

I have done a lot of experimenting on this, (on my kitchen stove and in the shop. Now I am getting ready to build a system for the Jeep.


Please do keep us informed Frank! And thanks for all the hard work on this, you're doing leg work that others will not have to now, we are indebt to you!
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